Tribes to be honored for preservation of Tamanowas Rock

By Leader Staff
Posted 4/26/16

The Jamestown S'Klallam and Port Gamble S'Klallam tribes are to be honored May 17 during a ceremony in Olympia highlighting achievements in historic preservation around the state.

Allyson Brooks, …

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Tribes to be honored for preservation of Tamanowas Rock

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The Jamestown S'Klallam and Port Gamble S'Klallam tribes are to be honored May 17 during a ceremony in Olympia highlighting achievements in historic preservation around the state.

Allyson Brooks, state historic preservation officer, announced the recipients of the 2016 Outstanding Achievements in Historic Preservation on April 19. The tribes are to be recognized for “Historic Preservation Stewardship,” which is one of seven award categories, for their efforts to protect Tamanowas Rock, a sacred tribal site located near Anderson Lake in Chimacum.

“The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe is very honored to receive this award,” wrote planning director Leanne Jenkins of the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe in an email to the Leader. “It represents many years of effort by the Tribal leadership and staff, as well as the Jefferson Land Trust in assisting with the acquisition of this sacred place, to protect it from future development and return it to the care of the S’Klallam people.”

The effort to protect the rock and surrounding acreage from development began about 17 years ago, and has included assistance from government and conservation organizations. Tamanowas Rock and 84 acres around it were purchased in late 2012 by the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe.

The rock is the prominent monolith visible among the trees just north of Chimacum High School, west of Anderson Lake State Park and above the Evergreen Coho SKP recreational vehicle park.

In 1976, Tamanowas Rock was listed in the Washington Heritage Register as having significant archaeological interest. The rock was added to the state Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation's Washington Heritage Register on June 29, 2015. The National Park Service added it to the National Register of Historic Places on Aug. 3, 2015.

Jenkins said a historic preservation grant from the National Park Service allowed Gideon Cauffman, a cultural resources specialist who worked with the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe between 2011 and 2015, to research and survey the site.

Benefits of being listed on these registries include tax credits, property tax deductions and code waivers to protect the resource, as well as protections from federal and state actions that would harm the property's historic values.

Jenkins said Tamanowas Rock has been used by native people for many years as hallowed ground and a sacred location for spirit and vision quests. “Tamanowis” in the Klallam language means “spirit power.” The rock is open to the public for viewing and enjoyment.

The Port Gamble S'Klallam Tribe is currently evaluating two kettle ponds on Black Point, south of Brinnon, to determine whether they would be eligible for inclusion on the National Register.

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