Proposed bill does not roll back Citizens United

Posted 9/4/19

At the recent Jefferson Dems Fish Feast, Rep. Derek Kilmer spoke about some of the legislation introduced by House Democrats this year. When he described HR 1 as a bill that would control corporate …

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Proposed bill does not roll back Citizens United

Posted

At the recent Jefferson Dems Fish Feast, Rep. Derek Kilmer spoke about some of the legislation introduced by House Democrats this year. When he described HR 1 as a bill that would control corporate power by ending corporate constitutional rights and money as speech, those of us who have been working on this issue were taken aback. HR 1 takes some very important steps toward protecting our democracy, but it can’t accomplish what Rep. Kilmer asserted that night. Surely he knows it was Supreme Court decisions that (1) allowed corporations to claim human rights and (2) equated money with speech, giving corporate interests and the super wealthy the enormous power they currently have over our government and our society. Rep. Kilmer must know that neither HR 1 nor any other Congressional action can reverse a Supreme Court decision.

This is why Jefferson County Move to Amend has been promoting HJR 48, the We the People Constitutional Amendment. Although there are other bills in the House and Senate proposing constitutional amendments to address money in politics, HJR 48 is the only amendment bill asserting that corporations may not claim the Constitutional rights of people and that political spending is not protected as free speech and must be regulated. This language will reverse court decisions that were legal precedents for the Citizens United decision or that currently allow corporations to dominate workers, hide information from consumers or resist regulations that protect our health, safety and the environment.

We appreciate that Rep. Derek Kilmer is a cosponsor of HJR 48, but we are concerned about his confusion of HR 1.

Judy D’Amore
Port Townsend

Comments

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Tom Camfield

Issues such as this tend to go right over the heads of average citizens caught up in daily affairs. That is one reason I so respect concise letters such as yours. "Corporations may not claim the Constitutional rights of people" seems to capture that with which I believe the greater American public would agree. But behind our backs our inattention is preyed upon by the ongoing conservative takeover of our judicial system—giving us an ivory-tower Supreme Court entirely out of touch with the real will of the people.

Wednesday, September 4
Justin Hale

"But behind our backs our inattention is preyed upon by the ongoing conservative takeover of our judicial system"—.....So what, both parties play the same game.

"entirely out of touch with the real will of the people."... And just exactly what is the "real will" of the people? Let me guess, it's what you believe. I think the movie Network pretty much nailed it, give me my big screen TV, my sports game, my six-pack and my radial tires and leave me alone.. A third of the eligible voters didn't bother to in 2016.

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Wednesday, September 4
TomCamfield

Both parties, Jason, do not "play the same game" by any stretch of the imagination." Bascially, this inter-party conflict is not a "game." At present we are, as Joe Biden said back in April, "in a battle for the soul of this nation."

Near as I can tell, the GOP doesn't really acknowledge the existence of soul. It seems to be obsessed with superiority and enabling the acquisition of wealth by the self-anointed privileged. Personally, I want to see them get the hell out of the way and let humanity prevail.

The inattentive, of course, still buy the old pie in the sky bit from the likes of a snake-oil salesman such as Donald Trump. He also insinuates to his minions that people less worthy than they are getting too much consideration. That damned appeal to superiority is getting a little old.

Thursday, September 5