Plant sales in full bloom

Stock up on garden greenery at May 4 sales

Posted 5/1/19

The scotch broom growing on the side of the highway isn’t the only spring flower beginning to bloom.

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Plant sales in full bloom

Stock up on garden greenery at May 4 sales

Posted

The scotch broom growing on the side of the highway isn’t the only spring flower beginning to bloom.

At the Native Plant Demonstration in HJ Carroll Park, white fawn lilies, Columbian larkspur and the delicate pink spreading phlox are popping out of the ground, bringing an array of colors to match the many shades of green in the garden.

Gardeners at the Native Plant Demonstration work hard to maintain it.

“We have worked there every Wednesday for 20 years,” said Linda Landkammer, one of the many gardeners who volunteers her time to keep up the demonstration.

While the plants that are there now are flourishing, the gardeners are hoping to add a prairie with more drought tolerant plants.

To keep the garden going, the group is holding a plant sale on May 4 from 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

“The proceeds from this sale go to the development of the native garden,” Landkammer said.

The sale is one of many taking place across the Peninsula on May 4.

While the Jefferson County Master Gardeners will be holding a sale at the same time at HJ Carroll Park, those who wish to travel a bit further can head to the Sequim Master Gardener plant sale at the Woodcock Demonstration Gardens.

“There were 70-plus master gardeners involved in putting this together,” said Cathy Wagner, a master gardener in Sequim. “They cultivated and seeded plants from their own gardens.”

Meanwhile, at the Swan School in Port Townsend, annual flowers, succulents, edibles and perennials, as well as hanging baskets will be available for sale to support the school on May 4 and 5.

If there are too many options, Landkammer suggests looking for native plants to add to your garden.

“A large number of native plants will thrive in average soil,” she said. “If more people planted natives in their garden, it would become a wildlife corridor for the birds, and bees and pollinators to come and spend time there.”

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