Opinion pages should provoke thought

Posted 8/28/19

Last week’s thoughtful and well-written “Perspective” by twelve of our local clergy was superb (“East Jefferson faith leaders make an appeal to our humanity” Leader, Aug …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Opinion pages should provoke thought

Posted

Last week’s thoughtful and well-written “Perspective” by twelve of our local clergy was superb (“East Jefferson faith leaders make an appeal to our humanity” Leader, Aug 21). It renewed and restored what I had been taught as a child in Bible studies. God’s message to care for the widow and the orphan, our brothers and sisters, our neighbors, and even strangers who come among us seemed to have gotten swallowed up by some “new and improved” version of God’s message.

Additionally, editor Dean  Miller offered a thought-provoking editorial (“Censors want a comfy truth that doesn’t exist”). In a newspaper’s letter-to-editor section, one can get a raw feel of the community from non-professional writers publicly expressing their thoughts, not hiding behind an anonymous screen name. Any writer is able to defend using guns to “legally” kill immigrants at our border, deny climate change, or support the Growlers “sound of freedom.”

Dean Miller pointed out that one republican was so outraged by a printed letter that he repeatedly contacted the paper stating that he was organizing a boycott of The Leader for printing the piece. Actually, this angry republican should be thankful he has the option to boycott. Ever hear of BDS?

Here’s a suggestion for the disgruntled man. Instead of boycotting The Leader, why not just write an intelligent and coherent rebuttal to the Aug. 14 letter, addressing each of the three points the writer made. With the time and energy you saved, lead the fight against those  policies that hurt the poor, the sick and elderly, and promote those which affirm their well-being and humanity. Prove that you are the good person you think you are.

Diane Jerich-Domin
Port Ludlow

Comments

1 comment on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment
Tom Camfield

Right. Logic, reality and human virtue all should play a provocative role in the public interchange of opinion. There's also the "what's in it for me?" aspect, however. it seems to have a blinding effect whenever virtue tiptoes in.

Thursday, August 29