More to see during Port Townsend's February Art Walk

Posted 1/31/17

'Fiber Fusion' at Northwind

Northwind Arts Center, 701 Water St., presents “Fiber Fusion” during the month of February. The exhibit showcases the depth and breadth of surface designers' work …

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More to see during Port Townsend's February Art Walk

Posted

'Fiber Fusion' at Northwind

Northwind Arts Center, 701 Water St., presents “Fiber Fusion” during the month of February. The exhibit showcases the depth and breadth of surface designers' work in Washington state and includes innovative artwork that uses a wide range of techniques. Fibers used include handmade felt, paper, fabric, clothing, basket-making materials, among others. The opening reception takes place during Art Walk, and an art talk is set for 1 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 12.

Quilts, 'Printed Word' at museum

The Jefferson Museum of Art & History, 540 Water St., is featuring two shows: “The Printed Word in Port Townsend” and “Quilting Memories.”

“Quilting Memories” features 26 quilts on loan from community members and from the Jefferson County Historical Society collection, dating back as far as the American Civil War. “The Printed Word in Port Townsend: Literary Presses of the 1970s and ’80s” explores the world of small presses during the town’s creative renaissance.

Mixed media at PT Gallery

Port Townsend Gallery, 715 Water St., presents tin-can art by Loran Scruggs along with Japanese folk art, and weaving by Rebekah Cadorette and Ann Norton.

Cadorette and Norton have been weaving as a team for more than 10 years, and Cadorette has spent the past three years exploring temari, the Japanese folk art of weaving ornaments.

Scruggs has been making works out of tin cans since 1991. Her work is a reflection of childhood, as that was a time of much play, the artist said.

Wood paintings at Salon Delucca

Port Townsend artist Katrina Blair Stringham presents wood paintings at Salon Delucca during Art Walk. At 6:30 p.m., she plans to give a brief talk about a work titled “Stick Figures.”

Stringham, 35, began her art studies at Port Townsend High School with Carol Long. During later studies at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver, British Columbia, she learned about working in mediums such as digital media, printmaking, metal, plastic, ceramics, wood and textiles. She also studied embroidery, and worked with several “anonymously famous” graffiti artists to embroider their tags, which she showed in the university gallery on Granville Island.

Stringham said music also has always been a personal fascination, and she has learning about sound processing and recording. The installation in the window at Salon Delucca is a group of acrylic paintings best described as “wood grain recordings,” which were created in the past year.

Salon Delucca is located in the Uptown District on Lawrence Street.

(Compiled by Leader staff writer Katie Kowalski.)

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