Life in Ludlow: What I learned on recent travels

Posted 10/3/17

Traveling to Nevada, Arizona, Indiana and Ohio over the past few weeks has reminded me of several things you probably know already.

First, and maybe least important, is confirmation of the …

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Life in Ludlow: What I learned on recent travels

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Traveling to Nevada, Arizona, Indiana and Ohio over the past few weeks has reminded me of several things you probably know already.

First, and maybe least important, is confirmation of the generally accepted notion that the weather here is pretty good compared to those places. Uncomfortably high temperatures outside are not all that much fun to play in, as Indianapolis experienced a sixth day in a row of temperatures above 90. That being said, we played anyway, from the Las Vegas Strip to the stands at the Wabash versus Hiram homecoming football game in Crawfordsville, Indiana. (In case you were interested, Wabash won 25-21. It’s now 3-0.)

A more interesting reminder is how diverse this country has become. There are tall and short people, skinny and heavy people, young and old people, and in spite of what we see in East Jefferson County, there are lots of nonwhite and white people out there! Even though we occasionally travel, these trips usually involve visiting familiar friends and relatives. They are certainly a diverse group, but since we were familiar with them in their “diversity,” we hardly notice. I think the best way for me to explain what struck me is to compare a walk along the streets of Seattle, where racial diversity is expected, with a walk in Port Townsend where racial diversity is tough to find. On the airplanes, at the football game, in restaurants and everywhere else, I was struck again by the richness generated by the diversity in our country.

I also noted that there are many people traveling these days. The planes are stuffed to the brim. The rental cars are sold out. The roads are full. A natural consequence of all this is that you make new friends and see old friends while you travel. For example, Port Ludlow luminaries Steve Hall and Kathy Kubesh were on the flight from Seattle to Indianapolis with us, heading to Cincinnati to see their daughter. They opted to rent a car and take the scenic route from Indianapolis to Cincinnati so that they could enjoy the bucolic countryside of southern Indiana and, yes, the heat.

You may not have started to think about your 2017 tax return yet, but BJ and her AARP Tax Aide colleague Ron Ryan have. They coordinate the folks who help many people in East Jefferson County in the preparation of their tax returns. Every year, they get a knowledgeable group of people who receive some training in December. There is also a need for people who can help with scheduling and facilitating the operations at the community centers in Port Townsend and Chimacum. If you can help in either manner, give Ron a call at 360-379-1226 or email him at ronkatr@msn.com. My take is that these people provide a valuable community service, work hard and have too much fun!

All this controversy concerning standing or kneeling for the national anthem reminds me of an observation made by Tom Clancy. He said, “The difference between reality and fiction? Fiction has to make sense.”

Love a curmudgeon and have a great week.

Contact Port Ludlow resident Ned Luce at nedluce@sbcglobal.net.

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