Investigations into stolen gold and silver continue

Kirk Boxleitner kboxleitner@ptleader.com
Posted 3/21/17

An investigation into who stole $110,000 worth of gold and silver coins and other pieces recovered in Everett has been complicated by the fact that it’s actually three separate investigations in …

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Investigations into stolen gold and silver continue

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An investigation into who stole $110,000 worth of gold and silver coins and other pieces recovered in Everett has been complicated by the fact that it’s actually three separate investigations in three counties, including Jefferson County.

Two victims, one in Jefferson County and one in Clallam County, have claimed the coins, which are being held by the Marysville Police Department.

Jefferson County Sheriff’s Detective Joe Nole praised the quality of information from his Clallam County counterpart, but said that the Jefferson County burglary victim has viewed the same photos of the coins and identified items as belonging to her.

“It is very possible that the actual owner, or owners, will be identified through DNA analysis,” said Nole, who declined to identify the victim or give details because the investigation is ongoing.

“Also, there is no one agency taking the lead on these investigations,” Nole added. “Each investigation is agency-specific, but we are all working together to determine the facts that will lead to a legally successful resolution.”

Detective Brian Knutson, the lead investigator for the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office investigation, said the nature of the ongoing investigation also prevents him from disclosing too many details about his case. Nonetheless, he was able to confirm that his victim was burglarized “a couple of days” before “the loot,” as he and Marysville police have referred to it, turned up in Everett.

“Much like the Jefferson County case, we had a burglary victim who had an extraordinary amount of gold coins and bars,” Knutson said. “I can say that our victim has looked at 10 photos of the property that was recovered in Everett, and she was able to identify all 10 photos [of the stolen property] as hers, but we won’t know if all the property is hers, or if some of it belongs to the Jefferson County victim, until we all go down to physically look at it. It does look promising for our victim, though.”

Knutson said that all three investigations have proceeded at their current pace because of the realities of coordinating the schedules of their respective investigators and victims.

“I’ve been discussing this case with detectives from Jefferson County, and we’ve been providing each other with updates,” Knutson said. “This is a case with a whole lot of talking involved, and just getting in touch with each other is more difficult than you might think, when so many folks are working different shifts.”

Knutson would welcome having both victims examine the recovered property at the same time, as much to make it easier for the Marysville police as for any other reason; however, because of those same scheduling conflicts, he couldn’t guarantee this could happen. In the meantime, he expressed his gratitude to the Marysville Police Department for keeping custody of the property.

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