‘Be a Light’ part 2 inspired by community response

Leader Staff, arts@ptleader.com
Posted 3/14/17

“I’m a not a large person, more like Piglet than Pooh. What can I do?”

“I don’t want to be hateful and angry. How do we bridge the gap even though we’re all different?”

“I lived …

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‘Be a Light’ part 2 inspired by community response

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“I’m a not a large person, more like Piglet than Pooh. What can I do?”

“I don’t want to be hateful and angry. How do we bridge the gap even though we’re all different?”

“I lived through fascism in Europe and Korea. I never want to see it again.”

These were just some of the thoughts shared by audience members during “Be a Light: The Art of Taking Action,” a theater event that took place earlier this year, said Marc Weinblatt, founder of Mandala Center for Change, which cohosted the interactive community performance and dialogue.

The January event at the Key City Playhouse was part of the national Ghostlight Project, a movement that encouraged people to come together Jan. 19 and pledge to stand for and protect the values of inclusion. The project brought together more than 750 theaters and groups in all 50 states.

Expanding on that event, Mandala, in association with Key City Public Theatre and the Goddard MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts program, is offering “Be a Light,” Part Two, which, in part, is to be inspired by the stories shared by audience members during the January event.

The event will be different from the first one, and have more of a problem-solving focus, said Weinblatt.

PERFORMANCES

Community performances featuring the Poetic Justice Theatre Ensemble are set for 7 p.m., Thursday, March 16 at Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St.; and 4 p.m., Tuesday, March 21 at Fort Worden Chapel. Admission is pay what you wish, with no one turned away for lack of funds.

In Part Two, Poetic Justice Theatre Ensemble is to present a new original short play titled “Land of the Free … ?” which depicts the struggle surrounding safety, inclusion, justice and “ally-ship” in the current political climate, said Weinblatt.

Audience members are invited to participate or simply witness the process.

“Our new performances aim to further inspire people – to serve as a battery, a kind of fuel for our humanity,” said Weinblatt in a press release. “Even if people are feeling scared, angry, overwhelmed or immobilized, this is a great opportunity to grapple with big questions and find concrete tools for action, not just on one’s own, but in community.”

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