Women's rights | Tom Camfield

Tom Camfield
Blogger
Posted 8/10/22

I’M ABOUT A WEEK BEHIND here and am skipping over piled-up notes on various topics to get in a few licks for women’s freedom, which is taking a beating these days.

Too bad the U.S. …

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Women's rights | Tom Camfield

Posted

I’M ABOUT A WEEK BEHIND here and am skipping over piled-up notes on various topics to get in a few licks for women’s freedom, which is taking a beating these days.

Too bad the U.S. Supreme Court put together by Donald Trump — and with which we are stuck through the foreseeable future — couldn’t have found a way to strike a blow against global warming. Instead, with a conservative majority now firmly ensconced in judicial robes, it hastened to strike instead at the Roe v. Wade ruling on abortion, which had stood as the law of the land since 1973.

It occurred to me the other day that it was only about 10 years before I was born that Congress ratified the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, granting women the right to vote in 1919.

So things had been moving steadily forward since the “barefoot and pregnant” days of yore, the right to vote a bit over 100 years ago, the right to a reasonable abortion about 50 years ago. But then along came Trump, McConnell and their cohorts.

Now with the country-wide right to abortion no longer in effect, a number of state Republican governments have eagerly jumped in to force their bass-ackward way of life onto the multitude — basically women, who are downgraded again to the role of mere livestock.

This so-called “pro-life” crowd in many cases appears to be totally unconcerned with the lives of both willing and unwilling mothers — rape, incest and a wide range of physical irregularities that could result in actual death. And where the states moved along in a slow but “united” way for quite some time on the matter of birth and female freedoms in general, it’s all now back, willy-nilly, to every state for itself.

There are spots of good news, however. The latest word includes “Republican candidates, facing a stark reality check from Kansas voters, are softening their once-uncompromising stands against abortion as they move toward the general election, recognizing that strict bans are unpopular and that the issue may be a major driver in the fall campaigns.”

The news columns last week noted: “Tuesday night's lopsided result in the Kansas abortion referendum — which saw the anti-abortion measure defeated some 59-41 in a traditionally red state — has Democrats and Republicans wondering if the post-Roe fight over the social issue marks a sea change in the midterm landscape or a less dramatic shift in an environment that still favors the GOP.

“The proposed amendment, which gave voters a direct choice over whether or not to strip the state constitution's abortion protections, marked the first tangible answer to the question of how June's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade will influence the electorate.” So I guess we’ll see how grim it all turns out in the coming mid-term election. Will Democracy regain its senses?

Meanwhile, The U.S. Department of Justice’s lawsuit against the state of Idaho — the first such lawsuit the federal government has filed against a state in the wake of the overturning of Roe v. Wade — is based on important matters of life and death, and raises legitimate questions about how Idaho’s abortion ban would be implemented. In essence, the DOJ lawsuit contends that Idaho’s trigger law is a violation of the federal Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act because it “preemptively criminalizes all abortions . . . even where a denial of care will likely result in the death of the patient,” U.S. Associate Attorney General Vanita Gupta said during a news conference last week.

The medical community for the past several weeks has been raising these alarms over Idaho’s abortion ban.

Without the protection of Roe v. Wade, 12 states already have banned or severely restricted abortion, with 14 others likely to impose bans.

Comments

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  • Justin Hale

    Too bad the U.S. Supreme Court couldn’t have found a way to strike a **** against global warming..... Since when is it the Supreme Court's duty to create law? Under the legal system established by the U.S. Constitution, the power to make laws is vested in Congress and retained by state legislatures. It is not the role of the Supreme Court to substitute the policy preferences of its members for those expressed in laws enacted by the people's elected representatives. The role of the judiciary in constitutional review is to determine if the law being challenged infringes on a constitutionally protected right, ******** was never a constitutionally protected right. "Now with the country-wide right to abor tion no longer in effect" There was never a "right" to an abor tion. Most of the states allow ********s under certain conditions, only 9 states ban abor tion outright.

    Those who believe ********s should be banned are nutz, those who believe abor - tions should be allowed up to the moment of birth are nutz, most of US live somewhere in the middle. The SCOTUS left it to the citizens, through their elected representatives to decide, isn't that Democracy?

    Wednesday, August 10 Report this

  • MargeS

    As the final arbiter of the law, the Court is charged with ensuring the American people the promise of equal justice under law and, thereby, also functions as guardian and interpreter of the Constitution. The Supreme Court is "distinctly American in concept and function," as Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes observed.

    Charles Evans Hughes served as Secretary of State from March 5, 1921, to March 5, 1925, during the administration of President Warren Harding. He continued as Secretary after Harding’s death in office, but resigned at the beginning of President Calvin Coolidge’s full term.

    What is Democracy? "Of the people, by the people, for the people" Abraham Lincoln. The word democracy comes from the Greek words "demos", meaning people, and "kratos" meaning power; so democracy can be thought of as "power of the people": a way of governing which depends on the will of the people.

    So when most Americans wanted Roe v Wade to remain the Supreme Court didn't give a crap? Welcome to the Trumpian utopia.

    Thursday, August 11 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    Most of that I agree with.

    I do not agree that the SCOTUS should be swayed by what most people want. The Constitution clearly states "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Const-itution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people”. The court acted appropriately by returning the abo -rtion issue back to the people.

    The quickest way to ensure the destruction of our country is the politicization of the SCOTUS which is already politicized in my opinion.

    Thursday, August 11 Report this

  • Thomas Camfield

    Rep. Liz Cheney is working hard to return some character to the GOP, which has been rotting away from the effects of Donald . Following is a current comment from her that I ran across on the Internet: "Rep. Liz Cheney released a closing message video ahead of a Republican primary she is expected to lose next week, framing the congressional race as part of a bigger fight for the soul of the nation.

    "Regardless of the race’s outcome, Cheney, a Wyoming Republican, has publicly hinted recently that she will run for president in 2024. Privately, those close to her have done nothing to discourage others from assuming she will. And while her video message spoke of a long fight required to reject the 'poisonous lies' of former President Donald Trump about the 2020 election, she did not give any specific hints about her future plans.

    "Cheney did, however, talk of a cause that she said would unite Republicans, Democrats and independents. That is a nod to a national effort she seems intent on leading that transcends party and ideology.

    “ 'America cannot remain free if we abandon the truth. The lie that the 2020 presidential election was stolen is insidious. It preys on those who love their country. It is a door Donald Trump opened to manipulate Americans to abandon their principles, to sacrifice their freedom, to justify violence, to ignore the rulings of our courts and the rule of law,”'Cheney said.

    “ 'This is Donald Trump’s legacy, but it cannot be the future of our nation,' she said."

    Thursday, August 11 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    Who gives a krap what Liz Cheney has to say?

    Thursday, August 11 Report this

  • MargeS

    It's not so much what Liz Cheney said, it's more about what the Jan 6th committee has uncovered. I am definitely not a Republican, but before Trump I had some respect for them. She's right, it's time to not only dump Trump but to bring criminal charges against him. Let's see what the FBI turned up at Mar-a-Lago. Will be "wild" I'm sure.

    Thursday, August 11 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    Dump Trump from what? After the fiasco that was the "Russian Collusion" story, the FBI proved that they are not to be trusted.

    Friday, August 12 Report this

  • Thomas Camfield

    The Mar-a-Lago situation came to pass only because Trump chose to place himself above the law and ignore previous subpoenas.

    Friday, August 12 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    Considering what the FBI/Justice Department/Deep State did to Trump with their phony "Russian Collusion" story, why would he cooperate with them? If you knew you were being framed would you cooperate with those doing the framing?

    Saturday, August 13 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    "Trump chose to place himself above the law and ignore previous subpoenas." Oh, you mean like Hillary Clinton did when she destroyed some 30,000 do***ents on her private server?

    Saturday, August 13 Report this

  • MargeS

    Obfuscating:

    Some people are experts at obfuscating the truth by being evasive, unclear, or obscure in the telling of the facts.

    If you are paying attention, the facts are in front of your eyes. Trump and his lawyers are masters at obfuscating.

    Sunday, August 14 Report this

  • Thomas Camfield

    Incidentally, I'm about as much a Democrat as one can get these days, but I'm highly interested in whatever Liz Cheney has to say where Donald Trump is concerned. I'd greatly prefer her than he in public office.

    Sunday, August 14 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    I have found that people who use the term Obfuscating really mean that someone else's narrative doesn't agree with theirs.

    Are you saying that Hillary can do what she wants with government do****ents but Trump can't?

    Sunday, August 14 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    "I'd greatly prefer her(Cheney) than he in public office. She probably couldn't skrew things up any worse than Biden.

    Sunday, August 14 Report this

  • MargeS

    Trump took records illegally. He knew what he was doing. Yes Biden is finally getting somethings done that should have been done long ago. Climate Change, drug prices, to start with. Can you explain to me how someone like Lauren Boebert ever got elected? Not to mention so many other Republicans that 30 years ago would have been laughed out of the Republican party. Oh yah, thats right it started way before that with Newt Gingrich, 1994, Newt speak, been down hill for the Republicans every since. And he still is blathering away, making now sense.

    Sunday, August 14 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    Hillary destroyed do****ents illegally, papers that were not hers to destroy, or even store. Tell me why she should get a pass and Trump should be prosecuted.....

    Biden is spending Billions of dollars on "Climate Change", dollars that we don't have, which will do nothing but cripple our economy while China and India continue to be major polluters and builders of coal-fired power plants.....

    Who is Lauren Boebert? And why should I care? I can explain how she got elected though, she got more votes for her than against her.

    Monday, August 15 Report this

  • MargeS

    Now I know why Trump was elected. Your fault.

    Monday, August 15 Report this

  • Justin Hale

    M.S. You have a terrible memory, how many times have I said in these comments that I voted for Sanders in the 2016 election? In the 2020 election I did vote for Trump, under Trump's administration we had low gas prices, reasonable grocery prices, reasonable hardware/lumber prices, our southern border was more secure and China was not threatening WWIII, why wouldn't I vote for more of that? Instead, we got Biden and Harris, your fault. Ask the average American if they are better off today, of course, you haters will never admit that Biden has been a disaster.

    Monday, August 15 Report this