News around town: 'I'm OK, I have an enchilada in my purse'

Patrick J. Sullivan psullivan@ptleader.com
Posted 3/7/17

When March enters like a frozen lion, when you’ve only got 22 days left to get your spouse a knockout birthday gift, and when you wake up to life passing you by, enjoy a reality check with Port …

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News around town: 'I'm OK, I have an enchilada in my purse'

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When March enters like a frozen lion, when you’ve only got 22 days left to get your spouse a knockout birthday gift, and when you wake up to life passing you by, enjoy a reality check with Port Townsend Observation Deck News Around Town.

T-SHIRT SAYING OF THE WEEK: “I’m OK. I’ve got an enchilada in my purse.”

HOUSING NEWS: February had ups and downs in the Jefferson County housing market, according to the Northwest Multiple Listing Service report dealing primarily with Realtor-listed properties. New residential and condominium listings for February 2017 are down (14 to 20) compared to February 2016, and are the same (29 to 29) year to date. Total active listings are down (33 to 36) comparing month to month. Pending sales are down (62 to 63) compared to February, and up (113 to 105) comparing year to date. Closed sales are up (34 to 28) for the month and down (71 to 75) year to date. The median closed sale price (half higher, half lower) is up ($281,500 to $275,750) for the month and up ($330,000 to $271,500) year to date. The most sales for the month were in Port Townsend (12), Port Ludlow (6), Discovery (4) and Shine (3).

ADVICE OF THE WEEK: Don’t let people say this about you: “Sober, greatest friend in the world. Intoxicated, biggest jerk on the planet.”

RECRUITMENT NEWS: It seems most every law enforcement agency has recruitment issues. Becoming a deputy or a police officer or a Border Patrol agent means, essentially, a person needs to be prepared to shoot or be shot at. The first step, says a seasoned police detective, is helping recruits separate make-believe from reality. “They have to realize it’s different than what they see on TV,” says a 30-year detective. “A big part is getting them out of that mind-set. Then, maybe you have a chance to get them trained to protect and serve.”

QUOTE OF THE WEEK: The Rhododendron Festival royalty candidates I viewed last Saturday evening had plenty to say. This unscripted moment caught my ear, from a teen who loves animals and took a summer trip to North Carolina to serve at a sanctuary for blind cats. What did she learn? “Blind cats don’t know they are blind. They know they are cats.”

(Patrick J. Sullivan of The Port Townsend & Jefferson County Leader learned to love a critter while visiting North Carolina: hush puppies.)

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