Money can be ugly by either its presence or its absence

Tom Camfield
Blogger
Posted 2/13/20

The foregoing is a short form that doesn’t include my years at WSU and UC Berkeley, my wife Jean’s early sacrifices, her belated retirement at age 67 as finance officer of the local …

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Money can be ugly by either its presence or its absence

Posted

The foregoing is a short form that doesn’t include my years at WSU and UC Berkeley, my wife Jean’s early sacrifices, her belated retirement at age 67 as finance officer of the local school district, our time in Northern California, etc. But first and foremost of the reasons for which this all is published is to lend testimony to the reality that Donald Trump doesn’t know squat about the average citizen whom he claims to represent. Nor does he really care squat about those of us who don’t (or didn’t) have a fat income.

Learning to bully the meek just doesn’t cut it. Blaming the poor and/or the non-white for society’s shortcomings also goes beyond egomania. And can you believe he’s actually planning to woo the black vote in 2020?

I was there during Donald’s earlier years as a racist, womanizing and self-aggrandizing money-grubber. He’s gotten a little fatter (which is why he wears his ties long and his coat unbuttoned). He’s gone through a few major bankruptcies. Overall he hasn’t changed much and he is aging with a total lack of grace and dignity.

It’s actually ridiculous that Trump claims great economic wisdom. The federal budget deficit hit $1 trillion in 2019, for the first time since the calendar year of 2012. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO)’s recent report showed that tax collections are considerably weaker than they would have been without the 2017 Republican tax law. That’s the law that Trump sold like a side-show barker to the public but used basically to benefit the wealthy and the corporate coal-burners.

So now we have those long on money and short on vision playing with the stock market and the Trump regime boasting of great strides in general prosperity that somehow eludes us commoners. It seems to me that wealthier sorts who can afford stocks and bonds will prosper in a deceptive way through the length of a presidential term if Trump wins another election.

Can you imagine another 4 1/2 years of Trump? Or, Heaven help us, even the vengeful “lame duck” period from Nov. 3 to Jan. 20 if he loses the election?

Soon as he gets through lying his way through the 2020 election, Donald will get to cutting Medicare and Social Security in general‚ while raising national defense (including his new Space Force). Donald already has told aides he will look for big spending cuts his second term. Just more deceitful words for the inattentive, words of anguish for those in need. The 2017 law locked in power rates for many corporations while creating only temporary savings for ordinary households.

The CBO Jan. 29 said the U.S. deficit will be more than one trillion per year and reach $1,700,000,000 for the 2030 year. The ballooning deficit is fueled by the federal government spending more than it takes in. By 2030 it is projected that the amount of debt held by the public will have increased to $31 trillion—about 98% of the size forecast for the entire nation’s economy.

On Monday of this week Donald released his proposed $4.8-trillion budget for the coming year.

He promised to pay off the federal debt as president, but during three years in office he has instead raised the deficit with big tax cuts and increased spending‚ leaving us little but short-term gaiety in the stock market . . . as many of us look back at his own bankrupt casino, airline, college, etc.

The budget for the coming year is expected to include big increases to fund the wall, Mexican border security and law personnel—yet 5% net cuts in domestic discretionary spending, including cutting the budget for the centers for Disease Control and Prevention despite the spreading coronavirus.

Here’s a site that shows all sorts of ever-changing numbers, including a U.S. budget total well over $23,000,000,000,000: https://www.usdebtclock.org/#
Wikipedia agreed that “As of February 2020, federal debt held by the public is 23.2 trillion" and every man, woman and child now owes $76,534. The federal deficit already has grown by about $3 trillion under Trump.

The new budget will make compromising difficult for the House of Representatives as it will contain various excesses that can be transferred for use in wall funding. “As in past budgets,” notes The Washington Post, “this one would cut heavily into low-income communities, including slashing community development block grants and home heating assistance. The Education Department would be cut by $6 billion.”

Present interest on the national debt is over $378,550,000,000 and, of course, climbing.

Comments

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Justin Hale

" The Congressional Budget Office (CBO)’s recent report showed that tax collections are considerably weaker than they would have been without the 2017 Republican tax law. "..... Isn't it terrible, the average working man/woman got to keep some of their money.

" the Trump regime boasting of great strides in general prosperity that somehow eludes us commoners".....Lowest unemployment in years, stock market at all time highs which certainly helps common people like my wife who has, through her work as an RN, a vested interest in the stock market.

I presume that you understand how the Federal budget is resolved, and with the majority of the House being Democrat, seems to me you are pointing the finger at the wrong people. But then that doesn't fit your anti-Trump narrative.

Friday, February 14
Tom ;camfield

I’m not sure you understand how our government works . . . or doesn’t. Here”s what Democrats have been trying to do in Congress (story in Vox the end of November: “House Democrats have passed nearly 400 bills. Trump and Republicans are ignoring them. Legislative paralysis gripped Capitol Hill well before impeachment started.”

Here’s the beginning of the story: “There’s a pervasive sense of legislative paralysis gripping Capitol Hill. And it’s been there long before the impeachment inquiry began.For months, President Donald Trump has fired off tweet missives accusing House Democrats of ‘getting nothing done in Congress,’ and being consumed with impeachment.

“Trump may want to look to the Republican-controlled Senate instead.Democrats in the House have been passing bills at a rapid clip; asNovember 15, the House has passed nearly 400 bills, not including resolutions. But the House Democratic Policy and Communications Committee estimates 80 percent of those bill have hit a snag in the Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is prioritizing confirming judges over passing bills.

“Congress has passed just 70 bills into law this year. Granted, it still has one more year in its term, but the number pales in comparison to recent past sessions of Congress, which typically see 300-500 bills passed in two years (and that is even a diminished number from the 700-800 bills passed in the 1970s and 1980s).”

Meanwhile, give me $1,000,000,000,000 to throw at the federal debt (on which we’re already paying $378,550,000,000 this year in interest, and it won’t make the headlines)—and while fairly well-off” “commoners” are living it up to the music of Wall Street, envision the penniless widow shivering in a poorly-insulated shack with 5%’less heating assistance over the winter.

Friday, February 14
Justin Hale

H.R. 1: For the People Act:..... These are a few items in that bill....."The package aims to require states to provide an online option for voter registration and allow voters to register the same day they go to the polls." Yeah, if the screw-up in Iowa was any indication, No thanks. Same day registration ?, no thanks. "including mandating presidential candidates release their tax returns.". Only if ALL politicians are required to do so, so again nope. So a resounding "thank-you" to Mitch McConnell for killing that.

H.R. 5: The Equality Act

"The Equality Act, which was introduced in March and passed in May, seeks to provide comprehensive anti-discrimination protections for LGBTQ Americans in employment, education, federal funding, housing, public accommodations and more."..... Special rights for sexual deviants? No thanks.

H.R. 6: The American Dream and Promise Act

"The American Dream and Promise Act, which was introduced in March and passed earlier this month, would protect young immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children — known as Dreamers — and establish a path to citizenship for more than 2 million immigrants without legal status.". As written I would vote against it.

H.R. 9: The Climate Action Now Act

"Democrats touted the bill, which, among other things, would block the Trump administration from exiting the Obama-era Paris climate agreement. "

I won't go on. Suffice to say that like the impeachment farce, I'm betting that the majority of the bills passed by the House are BS, IMHO.

"envision the penniless widow shivering in a poorly-insulated shack with 5%’ less heating assistance over the winter. ". I don't have to envision that scenario Tom I have a few friends who are in that situation. Good news Tom, PUD has the "Rainey Day" program where you can donate to help the low-income families get the heat they need this winter.

Saturday, February 15
'Tom Camfield

Which is why I'd be voting against you. P.T. elected me three times in years past—and my wife another three, plus various appointments. We have between us 157 years boots-'on-the-ground in residence here and will go down fighting for the people attitude of this town we grew up with,

Saturday, February 15
Justin Hale

Thank you, Tom and Jean, for your years of service.

Sunday, February 16