Mayer receives most votes in Chimacum School Board seat’s primary

Frogner, Martin vying for second spot on general election ballot

Posted 8/14/19

As of the latest available results, Kristina Mayer appears to be headed to the Nov. 5 general election ballot, while it’s an open question whether Gary Frogner or Steve Martin will be the second candidate on the ballot for the open Director District 3 seat on the Chimacum School Board.

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Mayer receives most votes in Chimacum School Board seat’s primary

Frogner, Martin vying for second spot on general election ballot

Posted

As of the latest available results, Kristina Mayer appears to be headed to the Nov. 5 general election ballot, while it’s an open question whether Gary Frogner or Steve Martin will be the second candidate on the ballot for the open Director District 3 seat on the Chimacum School Board.

As of 4:28 p.m. on Aug. 9, of the 2,595 votes counted, 1,355 were cast for Mayer, giving her 52.22% of the vote, enough to guarantee her spot on the ballot.

While 501 were cast for Frogner, giving him 19.31% of the vote, Martin received 500 of the votes cast, giving him 19.27% of the vote.

The remaining primary candidate, Jeremiah “Jeremy” Perrott, received 193 of the votes cast, giving him 7.44% of the vote.

Write-in votes were cast on 46 ballots, making up 1.77% of the vote.

According to County Election Coordinator Quinn Grewell, a one-vote difference between candidates running for the Chimacum School District’s Director District 3 seat falls within the category of a mandatory hand recount.

“The mandatory hand recount is subject to change, as the final count will be conducted upon certification with the canvassing board on Aug. 20,” Grewell said.

Mandatory recounts occur when the votes for offices fall within the statutory range.

Mandatory recounts by machine occur when the difference between the two candidates is less than 2,000 votes difference, and less than half of 1% of the total votes cast.

Mandatory recounts by hand occur when the difference between the two candidates is less than 150 votes, and less than one-quarter of 1% of the total votes cast.

The County Canvassing Board’s certification meeting is slated for 1 p.m. Aug. 20 and is open to the public in the election processing center.

CANDIDATE RESPONSES

Having received more than half the votes cast for Director District 3, and nearly three times the number of votes cast for her nearest opponents, Mayer told The Leader she was “very happy” to know she would be on this fall’s ballot, since it puts her “one step closer” to serving the Chimacum community.

“I am keeping my eye on the prize, as they say, to serve the students and families of Chimacum,” Mayer said. “I am committed to a platform of belief in the value of investment in our schools. We can build a brand that families will want to choose, and we can step into our full potential as a community who values our schools.”

Frogner described it as “an honor” to interact with other candidates, as well as the students, families and other community members who have shared their concerns, priorities and ideas with him.

“The Chimacum School District is at a crossroads,” said Frogner, who cited a decline in enrollment of 24.5% since the 2013-14 school year and a budget overrun of $1 million as among the challenges the district faces, along with the “leadership transitions” of superintendent, principals and teachers turning over, and the “learning environment challenges” of harassment, intimidation and bullying.

Frogner noted this election season would yield a 40% to 60% turnover in the Chimacum School Board, and asserted the school board’s makeup would determine “whether we continue this downward trend, or turn it around to rally behind a new vision of educational excellence.”

Frogner reiterated his belief that Chimacum schools can become “the preeminent educational choice” in Washington state.

“This transformation will require significantly increased community engagement, working together on behalf of Team Chimacum,” Frogner said. “I encourage the Chimacum schools community to join with me in common cause, as we get to work changing ‘Choose Chimacum’ from a slogan into a reality.”

In The Leader’s pre-election questionnaire, Mayer described herself as someone who has worked in schools, and as an activist working on Washington school reform measures, since 1993, while Frogner touted his status as a father and grandfather of Chimacum students, and said his experiences as a career submarine officer, engineer and business executive have prepared him to make sound policy for Chimacum schools.

Martin, who was contacted but did not reply to The Leader’s inquiries as of press time, described himself as a parent of two sons who currently attend Chimacum schools, giving him “skin in the game,” which he’s taken seriously by attending school board meetings and getting to know both faculty and administrators.

Mayer objected to being asked her position on “no confidence” votes of the Chimacum Education Association and three other unions in Superintendent Rich Thompson, while Frogner said he supports the unions’ right to publicize their votes, even as he added that he personally does not know enough about the situation to declare a position on Thompson’s fitness.

Martin believes that Chimacum’s teachers “deserve a superintendent with a respectful, transparent and collaborative leadership style,” and he stated, “I respect the teachers’ union for taking a vote on the matter.”

Martin offered no specific opinion on Thompson himself, but he did pledge to encourage more collaboration between the superintendent and the teachers, if he is elected.

The Chimacum School District enrolls about 940 students, employs 120 classified and certificated staff, and operates with a budget of nearly $15 million, or $15,960 per pupil.

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