On a roll

Kinetic Sculpture Race raises a ruckus

Posted 10/6/22

Hundreds of onlookers lined the water Saturday to mark the start of The Great Port Townsend Bay Kinetic Sculpture Race.

The mood by that point had long been high after The Glorious Parade marched …

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On a roll

Kinetic Sculpture Race raises a ruckus

Posted

Hundreds of onlookers lined the water Saturday to mark the start of The Great Port Townsend Bay Kinetic Sculpture Race.

The mood by that point had long been high after The Glorious Parade marched down Water Street with people in top hats sitting atop salamanders and mad scientists wheeling robotic monstrosities.

As the artfully inclined instruments of human-powered movement known as kinetic sculptures began to hit the water, the crowds cheered with each splash. The Flying Spaghetti Monster, with its emblematic idol high upon its sail, created the most waves in both the crowd and bay as it crashed into the sea.

On Sunday, the racers slogged through sand at Fort Worden before trudging their way through the “Dismal Bog,” a mud pit at the fairgrounds.

While many got stuck along the way, all managed to make it out. Some had an easier time of it than others though, like the Swing Kids sculpture pilot who nonchalantly chugged some chocolate syrup and bribed a judge while going along their merry way.

In the end, the coveted Mediocrity Award — which goes to the sculpture that finishes with their time most in the middle — went to Team Goddess Racing and their Goddess Bunny sculpture.

Tina Kerrigan, one of the pilots of the Goddess Bunny has been a participant in kinetic sculpture racing events for 36 years all over the country, but she likes Port Townsend most of all.

“This is definitely the funnest race,” Kerrigan said.

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