Fuel for the city

Brian Kelly bkelly@ptleader.com
Posted 8/17/20

Gary Siebel puts gas into his Ford Aerostar van while it's parked outside the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend Monday.

The art car is a work in progress, he said.

When asked "Why?", …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Fuel for the city

Posted

Gary Siebel puts gas into his Ford Aerostar van while it's parked outside the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend Monday.

The art car is a work in progress, he said.

When asked "Why?", Siebel answered: "More buildings are going up."
Siebel has lived in Port Townsend off and on since the first Wooden Boat Festival, and is a volunteer in the boatshop at the center.

His mobile landscape follows the look of a traditional Western city, but Siebel added it was no one in particular.

He does have plans to add pieces modeled after the Twin Towers of New York's World Trade Center, he said, as a memorial. After that, he'd like to drive the van to New York so people could see it.

That's not possible, he added, with where the world is now.

"It's pointless to make any plans," Siebel said.

The project is still evolving, he said, just as cities do.

"Every year I go through urban renewal. Technically, it's an endless project."

"It's a changing thing, like a city. Evolutionary."

He quickly pulled an unfinished but futuristic-looking building that had been sitting in the driver's seat.

Many of the buildings are made from pieces of yellow cedar; wood that's been scrapped by the center's boatshop. The wood is a collection, itself. Some teak over here, he pointed, and there's a piece of driftwood.

The van caught the attention Monday of many passersby.

"It's a great source of entertainment. A conversation piece," Siebel said.

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment