Dual boat launch to contrast classic and contemporary designs

Leader news staff
news@ptleader.com
Posted 9/2/21

The Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding was planning a dual boat launch early this week at the Point Hudson Marina.  

The two wooden boats, a traditionally built Herreshoff …

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Dual boat launch to contrast classic and contemporary designs

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The Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding was planning a dual boat launch early this week at the Point Hudson Marina.  

The two wooden boats, a traditionally built Herreshoff “Rozinante” and a fully electric wood composite workboat called “Clean Bay,” represent both ends of the spectrum when it comes to boat building.

The 28-foot Herreshoff Rozinante is planked in western red cedar over white oak frames. The rig has been modified by Doug Hylan, who moved the mizzen mast further aft in order to allow for better handling of the tiller. Known for its elegant lines, long keel, and classic look, the Herreshoff Rozinante has been a popular choice for boaters for almost 70 years. The construction of the Rozinante involved dozens of students spanning several classes, led by instructor Leland Gibson. 

“An entirely new wood boat construction, from the keel up, is quite the rarity these days,” Gibson noted.

“It’s important for students to build boats so they know how to take them apart and repair them. The more you put boats together, the better you become at problem solving.”

Built next door to the Rozinante, but a world apart in technology and objective, is the 25-foot “Clean Bay.” The contemporary boat is fully electric with a zero-emission propulsion system to keep waterways free of wastewater.

Local naval architect Tim Nolan created the design to look like a traditional Northwest workboat, however, its construction and intended job are novel.

Lead instructor Bruce Batchley says building Clean Bay has given students experience with laminating, strip-planking, cold-molded construction, and more. The all-electric vessel will be headquartered in Port Ludlow Bay, providing free pump-out services to recreational mariners. The project is a joint effort between local marine businesses, private donors, and state agencies to promote environmental stewardship – from its zero-emission propulsion system to its role in keeping waterways free of wastewater.

It has already been recognized by the state’s Maritime Blue Initiative for modeling effective use of zero-emissions systems for workboats.

Clean Bay provided a leap into the future for marine systems instructor Kevin Ritz and his students. From installing a 500-gallon wastewater tank, lithium ion battery banks, to solar panels and controller, the project gave students a chance to learn and experience real world problem solving skills which come with any new custom design and integration of new technologies.

“We are teaching and deploying state-of-the-art systems and propulsion technology for which, in many cases, standards have yet to be written,” Ritz said.

Both boats will stay at Point Hudson Marina during sea trials.

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