Driver charged in US 101 crash that killed 10-year-old girl

Posted 10/20/22

Authorities believe a Lake Stevens woman was impaired by drugs when her Toyota RAV4 went off US Highway 101 in July 2021 and hit two young girls who were standing in a field next to the …

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Driver charged in US 101 crash that killed 10-year-old girl

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Authorities believe a Lake Stevens woman was impaired by drugs when her Toyota RAV4 went off US Highway 101 in July 2021 and hit two young girls who were standing in a field next to the highway.

The crash north of Queets left a 10-year-old girl dead, and the 12-year-old girl who was standing next to her was airlifted to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle for treatment of serious injuries.

Charlene Servis Bradshaw, the driver of the Toyota, was charged last week in Jefferson County Superior Court with one count of vehicular homicide and one count of vehicular assault.

Bradshaw pleaded “not guilty” to the charges.

Prosecutors allege Bradshaw, 68, was impaired by medications at the time she went down the road and hit the two girls.

The wreck was investigated by the Washington State Patrol, and the State Patrol had previously attributed the crash to Bradshaw having a medical emergency and losing consciousness while she was driving north on US 101.

Bradshaw was not injured in the crash.

According to the State Patrol’s initial investigation, Bradshaw had passed through Queets and was near Milepost 153 on US 101 just after 1 p.m. July 19, 2021 when her Toyota drifted off the road, went into an irrigation ditch, then came out of the ditch and went through a clearing before hitting the girls.

Bradshaw had been staying with a family member in the two weeks prior to the deadly crash, and told the State Patrol she was on the way to Forks to visit her sister.

Bradshaw was taken to Grays Harbor Community Hospital after the incident and was contacted by a drug recognition expert, according to a statement of probable cause for Bradshaw’s arrest.

Court papers noted that a full evaluation of Bradshaw’s condition could not be done at the hospital because she kept falling asleep.

Investigators learned Bradshaw used a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machine at home, and her medical condition requires her to use the machine at least five nights a week, but she told a detective she had not brought the machine with her from Lake Stevens during her visit with family.

Authorities also noted that her medical records said doctors thought she likely had a dependence on opioids and had recommended Suboxone near the end of 2020, then prescribed Oxycodone after Bradshaw had a cardiac arrest sometime in November/December 2020 and blamed it on Suboxone. She was then prescribed Oxycodone again, according to court documents.

A blood test taken from Bradshaw after the wreck that was tested by the Washington State Patrol Toxicology Lab revealed the presence of Oxycodone, Cyclobenzaprine, and Gabapentin.

“Doctors who treated Bradshaw after the collision as well as during follow-up visits were not able to determine any medical condition that would cause Bradshaw to suddenly pass out or lose consciousness as she claimed,” a detective noted.

The report said the collision was caused by “Bradshaw’s choice to drive after taking multiple impairing medications and failing to use her CPAP machine as recommended to keep her awake and alert throughout the day.”

Bradshaw made her first appearance Friday in Jefferson County Superior Court via Zoom.

Jefferson County Prosecutor James Kennedy said she had no criminal record, including any prior traffic offenses. He did not ask that Bradshaw be held on bail, but her conditions for release include a prohibition on any driving.

Kennedy also said her license had been suspended earlier that day.

“At the time of the incident she was driving without insurance,” he added.

Kennedy also noted that her prescriptions made it unsafe for her to be driving at any time.

“She is never safe to drive,” he said.

Scott Charlton, Bradshaw’s attorney, said she was homebound and disabled, and unable to travel. Bradshaw agreed.

“I’m homebound. I can’t go outside,” she told the court. “I’m bedridden, pretty much.”

Superior Court Judge Keith Harper agreed with the recommendation: “You’re not to drive at all for the time being.”

Her trial was set to start Jan. 9.

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