Agreement OK’d for fish-friendly culverts on Thorndyke Creek

Leader News Staff
news@ptleader.com
Posted 11/25/21

Jefferson County has OK’d an agreement with a $1.9 million culvert replacement project on Thorndyke Road at Thorndyke Creek with the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.

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Agreement OK’d for fish-friendly culverts on Thorndyke Creek

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Jefferson County has OK’d an agreement with a $1.9 million culvert replacement project on Thorndyke Road at Thorndyke Creek with the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.

The project includes construction of a new fish passable structure, which is described in contract documents as a 35-foot-long concrete bridge.

The work will also include construction management, construction inspection, materials testing, fish exclusion, and site restoration and re-vegetation.

The existing crossing includes two 60-inch corrugated metal pipe culverts that state officials say are a barrier to fish passage. Thorndyke Creek is home to  fall chum salmon, Coho salmon, steelhead trout, and sea-run cutthroat trout.

Thorndyke Creek is a tributary to the Thorndyke Bay estuary and Hood Canal, and officials said the improvements will make more than 15 miles of the creek upstream of the Thorndyke Road crossing accessible to fish.

Work on the project started earlier this year, with restoration efforts planned for July 2023 and the project to come to a close in June 2024.

More than $1.65 million for the culvert replacement has been approved by Washington state’s Brian Abbott Fish Barrier Removal Board. Matching funds of $200,000 are coming from a grant by the National Fish Passage Program, and $92,916 from the Jefferson County Road Fund.

Jefferson County commissioners unanimously approved the project agreement with the Recreation and Conservation Office at their meeting Nov. 21.

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